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Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey Moving Kinship Surrey

Moving Kinship Surrey

Moving Kinship Surrey

Moving Kinship creates dance with and for people from diverse communities

Photo: Julia Testa
Dancers: Takeshi Matsumoto, Maria Olga Palliani, Luke Birch, Rudzani Moleya, Aneta Zwierzynska

 

Moving Kinship is a form of artistic activism underpinned by transdisciplinary feminist research that takes place in UK and international Hubs. The project involves creating bespoke live and digital performances for diverse audiences as a way of bearing witness to and engaging with, issues of loss, vulnerability, othering, care and hope, that chime with experiences of mental health inequalities, the COVID 19 global pandemic and our ecological crisis. To date, Beatrice Allegranti Company has worked with families affected by young onset dementia, LGBTQ+ communities, with climate activists, across NHS adult mental health services, with NHS clinicians, and with artists and scientists in the UK, Norway, the Netherlands and Japan. Through artistic collaboration, the project Moving Kinship creates dance with and for people from diverse communities.

 

Photo: Julia Testa     Dancers: Takeshi Matsumoto & Maria Olga Palliani

Supported by Arts Council England, Surrey Arts/Dance 21 and Public Health, the participatory project is led by Beatrice Allegranti Company and in partnership with public and grass roots organisations across the arts, health and science sectors and academic partners.

This page documents our Moving Kinship hub in a Surrey care home for people living with dementia.

Photo: Julia Testa
Dancers: Takeshi Matsumoto, Maria Olga Palliani, Luke Birch, Rudzani Moleya, Aneta Zwierzynska

 

The Surrey edition of our Moving Kinship Hub included a collaboration with comic illustrator Neil Max Emmanuel. Alongside the personalised illustrations Beatrice worked individually with care home residents to co-create poems expressing their personal experiences of living with dementia and their cherished embodied memories. Extracts from these poems were spoken during the dance performance, and will appear in a forthcoming dementia comic book illustrated by Neil Max Emmanuel.

 

Starling

Do you like dancing?

we were more into action

something doesn’t matter what

Yes, yes, yes,

I am the last person

My family

Across the world

I’m the last one

Where am I going to go?

I am the last one

I have no family, at all

only me

I am the last

Starling.

 

My Birthday

I was born in Malawi

I was the first white child born in one particular chief’s territory

I was adopted into his tribe

Every year they used to come

You could hear them before you saw them 

They’d come on my birthday every year

wouldn’t it be extraordinary if they were to just walk in now?’

 

Photos: Julia Testa

 

The direct outcomes of the sessions you offer at your Moving Kinship hubs are improved wellbeing for participants, creative support for people living with young onset dementia and their families, improved family communication and feelings of empowerment for all involved. The Moving Kinship Hub offers a means to provide real support to people with young onset dementia and their families and carers, allowing them to see their own stories and then engage as families. 

Daniel Butler

Senior Principal, Public Health

 

Funding

Arts Council England, Public Health; Alexandra Palace, Surrey Arts/Dance 21.

Partnerships

Alexandra Palace; Merton Arts Space; Merton Council; Public Health (Merton); Dementia Action Alliance; Dementia Pathfinders; St George’s NHS; Created Out of Mind at Wellcome; University of Roehampton; Bergen International Festival; Red Cross Bergen; University of Bergen; South West Yorkshire NHS; LGBTQ Music Study Group; Yorkshire Dance, Surrey Arts, Dance 21; Queer Britain Museum.

Publications

Research publications emerging from the Moving Kinship project:

Allegranti, B. (2019) ‘Moving Kinship: Between Choreography, Performance and the More-Than-Human’. In Prickett, S, and Thomas, H. The Routledge Companion to Dance Studies. London: Routledge.

Allegranti, B. (2020) ‘Dancing Activism: Choreographing the Material With/in Dementia. In Chaiklin, S. and Wengrower, H. Dance Movement Therapy and the Creative Process: International perspectives. New York: Routledge.

Allegranti, B. (2016) ‘Dementia and Embodied Psychotherapy. Therapy Today Magazine. BACP Publication. Cover story. 

 

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